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Around the world, goat meat is associated with festivals and celebrations. In Latin America and Mexico, goat is a traditional dish at a Quinceañera, the celebration of a girl's fifteenth birthday. In Muslim cultures, and in India especially, the Festival of Sacrifice is celebrated with the sacrifice of the best goat one can find and the gift of the meat to relatives, friends, and the needy. In Korea, goat meat is believed to aid male virility. Liberians consider goat meat soup their national soup, and serve it on important holidays like Independence Day, New Years, and Christmas; whole roast goat is also popular for Christmas celebrations across East Africa.
Despite its status as a delicacy in many cultures, goat meat has historically been neglected by the food culture of the United States. That is slowly changing, as Americans learn to appreciate the great flavor and health benefits of goat meat. Scarpetta, opened in New York by Chef Scott Conant in 2008, has a Moist Roasted Carpretto as a signature dish, recommended by the New York Times in its three star review. (Carpretto (Italian) and cabrito (Spanish) are young goats, ranging in age from eight weeks to a few months old, depending on the dish.) In the past year, goat has also been seen on the menu at Chez Panisse, the restaurant where the slow food movement began. A new term, chevron, has been coined to reflect the upscale nature of goat meat.
Our family are recent converts to goat meat; before we owned goats, we had only tried it a few times at ethnic restaurants. We quickly became enamored of goat meat for its fabulous earthy flavor and the way it held up to recipes in which we used to use lamb or pork. For instance, the Adobo you can find on our website was given to us as a pork recipe, but is much tastier and healthier prepared with Brookshire Farm goat.
In addition to tasting delicious, goat meat has many health benefits. It is very lean, with less fat than chicken and approximately 30 calories per ounce. Brookshire Farm goats are raised on their mother's milk and a free choice of pasture, which gives them the same health-boosting increases in conjugated lineolic acid (CLA), vitamin E, omega-3 fatty acids, beta-carotene, and vitamin A as our beef.
For the last two years, Brookshire Farm has offered a small number of goat kids, but has focused on growing our herd by retaining all our female goats. Our herd has finally gotten big enough that we will be able to offer our customers more than the occasional goat, and we are celebrating by offering our first shares of goat. For a limited time, based on availability, we are offering a "Taste of Goat" package. Each package will include three pounds of ground goat, three pounds of boneless goat stew meat, and three pounds of smoked goat sausage and will be available after August 17th. We chose these cuts to give people an opportunity to try a taste of goat. If you are a more ambitious chef and wish to try dishes like Scott Conant's carpretto or Anthony Bordain's Gigot de Sept Heures (recipes available on our website) we also have a few whole goats that will be available in late July through August.


COW CHAT

We are preparing pastures for Brown-Top Millet which will finish our fall beeves. The steers we have selected are growing fat and happy on summer pastures and will be ready to finish in mid-October. We have already pre-sold more than half our fall beeves. If you are on the fence about beef for the fall, be sure to jump before it's all gone. Reserve your share by sending a $200 deposit to the Farm.

ORDER INFORMATION AND PRICES   ORDER FORM
To order Brookshire Farm Grass Fed 'n Finished Beef or Goat, send your check to the farm.

Beef: $200 deposit per quarter, the balance paid on an actual animal after harvest.
Goat: $40 for a package of smoked sausage, stew and ground, 3lbs each, so 9 lbs total.
$90 for a whole goat. $20 to deliver to your processor who will charge for slaughter & packaging.

   An Old Farmer's Advice:
Don't be so busy hankerin' after the cows you ain't got to watch after the ones you do.


Newsletter: Vol 3 No 2-Summer 2009